Applied Microeconomics

Because of the diversity of topics within applied microeconomics and our faculty’s expertise, we list three different tracks within this field. Students may major in only one of these tracks or pursue one track as major and another one as a minor.

Environmental Economics

The purpose of this class is to provide a snapshot of current topics and methods in Environmental Economics and to assist students to develop the skills necessary to be a successful empirical researcher. The material will focus on micro-empirical applications quantifying the damages of pollution and climate change, and analyzing policies to mitigate pollution in the developed and developing world. Sample syllabus.

This is a year-long course in which external speakers are invited to present their research in applied microeconomics. The seminar is run jointly with the Tepper School of Business and the Heinz School of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University.

Urban / Public Economics

 

The purpose of this class is to provide a broad overview of the classic topics in public economics as well as acquaint students with empirical work in political economy, immigration, and public goods provision in American history. Most lectures will focus on theory and applications, and we will replicate two papers in the public and labor literature with the objective of acquiring empirical research skills. Sample syllabus

This is a year-long course in which external speakers are invited to present their research in applied microeconomics. The seminar is run jointly with the Tepper School of Business and the Heinz School of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University.

History / Institutions

(Cross-listing: International / Development / Comparative Economics)
This course surveys research in economic history. The course includes a mix of older, classic articles and newer articles in general interest journals. A wide range of topics are covered, but special emphasis is given to questions related to the origins of American economic progress, particularly institutional factors. Questions regarding economic mobility, race, and the environment also receive special attention. The goals of the course are twofold: to introduce students to the most important events in American economic history; and to introduce students to some of the most creative and rigorous research taking place in economic history. Sample syllabus

This is a year-long course in which external speakers are invited to present their research in applied microeconomics. The seminar is run jointly with the Tepper School of Business and the Heinz School of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University.